April 29 Chapman & April 30 Closing Reception – the last two April GAPM events

As human beings, our greatness lies not so much in being able to remake the world as in being able to remake ourselves.
– Mahatma Gandhi

Hi everyone,

This coming week brings the final two events of the April 2014 GAPM film series, Remembering the Past toward Healing our Future.

Tuesday, April 29 at 7p, please join us at Chapman University for An Evening of Holocaust Remembrance that includes a screening of the film, “Numbered”. The program also includes a Musical Tribute, Lighting of Candles and a talk given by the filmmaker, Uriel Sinai. Just like all of our other events this month, we will be asking you to contribute your heart felt thoughts on one of the cards that features a photograph and story of a genocide survivor or victim. Messages from all events become part of the mobile exhibit “Everyone Has a Name” on display the following evening at the Closing Reception.

Details of the Wednesday April 30 7p Closing Reception are as follows. We wanted to offer a time to get together and connect after six very powerful events. Integration of experiences is an important part of any journey. Please join us in the University Synagogue Social Hall as we gather for reflective conversation, and begin to think about how we can collaboratively move forward, addressing the question: what’s next?

If you plan to attend on April 29 or April 30, R.S.V.P. now ». Continue reading

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The trans-generational nature of trauma

There are many instances in which we are not the master’s of our fate. Yet our helplessness in these areas is tolerable because all human beings are in the same boat. And we need each other to counter the darkness, to keep out the cold, to provide meaning to existence. Human beings are social creatures. It is with other people that we find the warmth, the excitement, and the challenge of life. And only within the human community do we dare face the frightening unknown.
 – Alexander Lowen

Hi everyone,

Yesterday, I had a conversation with a reporter about the upcoming April events. The conversation headed in the direction that conversations often go when I am involved, toward trans-generational trauma.

  • Women pregnant during 9/11 gave birth to infants with stress hormone levels that correlate with trauma.
  • Attachment researchers identified compelling evidence that mothers with unresolved grief and trauma are frequently unable to provide the secure attachment necessary for babies’ optimal health and emotional / intellectual development. Many of these babies throughout their lifetime have increased risk of physical, emotional and relational difficulties, and increased risk of developing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

The myth that children are “resilient” persists. As child trauma expert, Dr. Bruce Perry, put it, children are not resilient; they are malleable. Continue reading

We survive because we can love.

Humankind would not have endured and cannot continue without the capacity to form rewarding, nurturing, and enduring relationships. We survive because we can love. And we can love because we can empathize — that is, stand in another’s shoes and care about what it feels like to be there.
 – Bruce Perry & Maia Szalavitz

Hi everyone,

June 25, 2009 is a date of great historical significance. It is the day Michael Jackson died. Seeking to process the shock and heartbreak brought on by the suddenness of his passing, people spoke of little else that day, especially in Los Angeles.

Meanwhile, also on that day, Martina Knee, of the San Francisco Bay Area Darfur Coalition, flew in to LAX, as I drove up from Orange County (and got distinctly, profoundly lost), in order to meet with Peter Marcus, of Jewish World Watch, in his Los Angeles law office. As Carl Wilkens Fellows (an anti-genocide leadership program) our meeting was to discuss a possible statewide initiative: to get the state of California to pass legislation for April to receive the official designation, Genocide Awareness and Prevention Month. Continue reading

Remembering the Past toward Healing our Future: April 29 (The Holocaust)

April 2014 Genocide Awareness and Prevention Month

Remembering and telling the truth about terrible events are prerequisites both for the restoration of the social order and for the healing of individual victims.
– Judith Herman

Remembering the Past toward Healing our Future

A free six-event commemorative film series featuring stories of survivors and their children

An Evening of Holocaust Remembrance

Numbered (2012)

GENOCIDE: The Holocaust
Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 7-8:30pm
Chapman University

Chapman Auditorium, Memorial Hall
One University Dr. Orange, CA 92866
campus map
(See below for closest PARKING and fee details.)
Speaker: URIEL SINAI
Lighting of Candles of Remembrance
Musical Tribute: CANTOR CHAYIM FRENKEL,
Kehillat Israel Reconstructionist Congregation of Pacific Palisades
Accompanied by DAVID KAMENIR
Words of Reflection: RABBI HEIDI COHEN,
Temple Beth Shalom, Santa Ana
REV. DR. GAIL STEARNS,
Dean of the Wallace All Faiths Chapel, Chapman University

The Rodgers Center for Holocaust Education
The Stern Chair in Holocaust Education
The Sala and Aron Samueli Holocaust Memorial Library

RSVP
Space is limited.

Continue reading

Remembering the Past toward Healing our Future, A six event commemorative film series

April 2014 Genocide Awareness and Prevention Month

It is very tempting to take the side of the perpetrator. All the perpetrator asks is that the bystander do nothing. He appeals to the universal desire to see, hear, and speak no evil. The victim, on the contrary, asks the bystander to share the burden of the pain. The victim demands action, engagement, and remembering.
– Judith Herman

Remembering the Past toward Healing our Future

A free six-event commemorative film series featuring stories of survivors and the children

Living Ubuntu, in collaboration with Amnesty International-Irvine, additional community partners and the below academic institutions, presents a six-event commemorative film series featuring the stories of survivors and their children. April is Genocide Awareness and Prevention Month, and each film commemorates a genocide that started during April. Living Ubuntu provides education about global traumas as part of its mission to heal trauma in order to promote peace.

All events are free and open to the public.

For complete details on each event, see links below. Continue reading